Tag Archives: Beyond Zero Campaign

Obstetric Fistula afflicts nearly 100,000 women in Kenya – Japheth Mati

The recently released findings of the 2014 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (KDHS 2014) included, for the first time ever, an estimate of the prevalence of fistula in Kenya. After describing the condition, women were asked if they had ever experienced the symptoms of fistula, to which 1 percent responded in the affirmative. What this means is that 1 percent of women of childbearing age (15-49 years) had actually suffered a fistula, and based on the 2009 population census, this translates to at least 93,120 women.

As I read the KDHS results recently, I could not help recalling a post I made three years back, under the title “Remembering my fistula patients as Kenya observes FGM Day”. I was referring to the 1970s when I was one of two gynaecologists in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), who had special interest in the treatment of urinary incontinence, the commonest cause of this being vesico-vaginal fistula (VVF). I remember that at any given day there would be one or two such cases in my ward.

This condition, which arises mainly from prolonged obstruction of labour during childbirth, is a preventable problem if only all pregnant women received skilled care during labour and delivery. Yet it has persisted as a major problem, decade after decade.

Dr Peter Candler way back in 1954 reported that obstetric VVF was the commonest gynaecological condition encountered at the King George VI Hospital (today’s KNH); and as I indicated above, it still was common in the 1970s. How sad it is that decades after independence, a substantial proportion of Kenyan women remain at risk of this tragedy. Today, the KDHS data tells us there could be well over 93,000 women living with the condition.

On the brighter side we must recognise the commendable efforts in the recent past towards improving access to surgical treatment of fistula. But the magnitude of the problem remains intimidating. How long will it take to clear the backlog, while at the same time new cases are being created?

Let us assume 10 hospitals undertook to operate 10 cases daily, 5 days a week, completing 500 surgeries per week. To do all 93,120 women at that speed would take 187 weeks or 3.5 years. But this assumes that no new cases are added throughout the 3.5 years and that each operation was successful, (which is not always the case!), and more importantly, the survey estimate of 1 percent was correct, (stigma could have affected responses). Finally, it is possible that a crush programme involving surgical camps may accomplish the task sooner, the cost and logistic nightmare notwithstanding.

On the whole, the above underlies the importance of prioritising prevention. Looking to the future, the hope lies in improving access to skilled maternal health care for all pregnant women, antenatal care and delivery services. This is the only way of eliminating the risk of obstetric fistula. In this regard, kudos to our First Lady! Her Initiative, Beyond Zero Campaign, is a practical demonstration of her love for the women and children of Kenya. Indeed, such level of commitment is unprecedented.

The KDHS 2014 has given us some hope- the proportion of women who received skilled care during delivery has increased from 44 percent in 2008/9 to 62 percent in 2014, while those who gave birth in a health facility increased from 42 percent in 2008/9 to 61 percent in 2014. Even though a lot remains to reach the MDG 5 target of 90% by 2015, this data is, nevertheless, extremely encouraging and motivating. Better late than never!

We salute the Initiative by Kenya’s First Lady towards improved maternal and child health outcomes in Kenya. Japheth Mati MD

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The “Beyond Zero Campaign” launched on 24 January 2014 under the stewardship of Kenya’s First Lady, Margaret Kenyatta, seeks to improve maternal and child health outcomes in Kenya. Her enthusiasm and commitment to the success of the Initiative, including the pledge to raise funds for it through participation in the forthcoming London Marathon, is completely unprecedented in Kenya’s history. We salute this initiative by the First Lady of Kenya.

The Strategic Framework for the engagement of the First Lady in HIV control and promotion of maternal, newborn and child health in Kenya, which was unveiled on World AIDS Day 2013 focuses on the following five key areas: (i) Accelerating HIV programmes, (ii) Influencing investment in high impact activities to promote maternal and child health and HIV control, (iii) Mobilizing men as clients, partners and agents of change, (iv) Involving communities to address barriers to accessing HIV, maternal and child health services and (v) Providing leadership, accountability and recognition to accelerate the attainment of HIV, maternal and child health targets.

In an earlier post under the title “What’s in the way of achieving improved maternal health in Kenya” it was observed that there is sufficient knowledge of the causes of maternal deaths, and how they can be prevented. It is known which interventions work and which do not. What appears to be the main barrier is the lack of commitment to act; to prioritize reduction of maternal mortality, and to reflect this in resource allocations to the health sector, and to maternal health services, in particular.

The health budgets in most African countries, Kenya included, do not demonstrate that health is rated as a high priority among other national needs. This is often the result of failure by governments to recognise the importance of health in development, so that expenditure on health is not perceived as a critical economic investment alongside spending on education, agriculture or industries. Yet, health is a critical resource, without which investment in all other sectors would go to waste. Further, poor health creates critical barriers to economic production.

Within the health sector, lack of equity in planning and distribution of resources for health results in inequitable access to health care services: Physical access (e.g. distance to the nearest health facility); Affordability (when fees charged for services are unaffordable); Acceptability (where people lack confidence in the services provided and decide not to utilise them). People who are denied access through the above barriers often turn to out-of-pocket expenditures on their health care. Ironically, evidence reveals that the poor bear the heaviest burden of out-of-pocket health expenditures, irrespective of where they seek health care.

From available evidence it is obvious that local and international health goals cannot be achieved without emphasis on equitable expansion of access to basic services for all. Policy makers and planners must begin to accept the existence of, and to act on, the vast inter- and intra-regional health disparities in Kenya. It was the expectation that devolution would create opportunities for better prioritization of needs at the grassroots, and, through better knowledge of community needs, formulate more focused interventions. 

Engaging with communities as envisaged in key area (iv) of the proposed Strategic Framework is indeed a critical focus, considering that proximity to health facilities and services, is no guarantee they will be utilised. For example, there are several areas in Kenya, both rural and urban, where communities will prefer traditional medicine as their first line of health care before modern drugs are sought. There is evidence to show that within certain communities in Kenya, majority of pregnant women will have consulted a mganga (traditional healer) who administered to them herbal preparations and potions to ward off evil spirits, before making their first antenatal clinic visit[1]. These women perceive antenatal care services available at health facilities- dispensaries and health centres, and those provided by TBAs and herbalists, to be complementary, and generally, they seek both types of care interchangeably. This may have negative effects, for example, due to delays in early diagnosis and management of antenatal complications, resulting in poor pregnancy outcomes.

https://africahealth.wordpress.com/2010/10/27/what%E2%80%99s-in-the-way-of-achieving-improved-maternal-health-in-kenya/

Family Care International: Care-Seeking During Pregnancy, Delivery, and the Postpartum Period: A Study in Homabay and Migori Districts, Kenya, September 2003 http://www.familycareintl.org/UserFiles/File/SCI%20Kenya%20qualitative%20report.pdf


[1]Family Care International: Care-Seeking During Pregnancy, Delivery, and the Postpartum Period: A Study in Homabay and Migori Districts, Kenya, September 2003 http://www.familycareintl.org/UserFiles/File/SCI%20Kenya%20qualitative%20report.pdf

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